Treatments of the Midfoot

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  • Cavus Foot Surgery

    A cavus foot has a high arch. The cavus can range from being slightly high to severely deformed, causing a patient to walk on the outside of the foot. Surgery sometimes is needed to realign the foot.

    While the cause of a high-arched foot it often unknown, a cavus could be caused by nerve disease, clubfoot, or injury. Treatment ranges from changes in shoes to surgeries, depending on the amount of deformity and related problems.

    The main goals of cavus foot surgery are to reduce pain, improve function, and prevent further damage or injuries.

  • Cavus Foot Surgery

    A cavus foot has a high arch. The cavus can range from being slightly high to severely deformed, causing a patient to walk on the outside of the foot. Surgery sometimes is needed to realign the foot.

    While the cause of a high-arched foot it often unknown, a cavus could be caused by nerve disease, clubfoot, or injury. Treatment ranges from changes in shoes to surgeries, depending on the amount of deformity and related problems.

    The main goals of cavus foot surgery are to reduce pain, improve function, and prevent further damage or injuries.

  • Fifth Metatarsal Fracture Surgery

    The metatarsal bones are the long bones in the middle of the foot. Each metatarsal bone has a base, a shaft, a neck, and a head. The fifth metatarsal is the last bone at the outside of the foot, and most breaks of the fifth metatarsal occur at the base.

    The majority of fifth metatarsal fractures are treated without surgery. However, certain situations may require surgical treatment. Surgery can be performed to help the bone heal in a correct position and return the patient to full function. Surgery may reduce the time needed for immobilization and improve the chance of healing compared to non-surgical treatment.

  • Flatfoot Surgical Correction

    Adult flatfoot is a condition that is characterized by the collapse of the arch of the foot. Surgery will improve alignment of the foot and restore more normal pressure during standing and walking. A combination of procedures often is needed to repair the ligaments and tendons that support the arch. Bone cuts are made to help restore the arch. Proper correction of flatfoot deformity can help reduce pain and improve walking ability.

  • Flatfoot Surgical Correction

    Adult flatfoot is a condition that is characterized by the collapse of the arch of the foot. Surgery will improve alignment of the foot and restore more normal pressure during standing and walking. A combination of procedures often is needed to repair the ligaments and tendons that support the arch. Bone cuts are made to help restore the arch. Proper correction of flatfoot deformity can help reduce pain and improve walking ability.

  • Flexor Digitorum Longus (FDL) Tendon Transfer to Posterior Tibial Tendon

    The flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is one of the tendons responsible for bending the toes down to the floor. The goals of a FDL tendon transfer surgery are to relieve pain and to help restore the arch in patients with painful fallen arches. A fallen arch occurs when the foot loses its support and flattens out, generally due to weakening of tendons and ligaments in the foot.

  • Flexor Digitorum Longus (FDL) Tendon Transfer to Posterior Tibial Tendon

    The flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is one of the tendons responsible for bending the toes down to the floor. The goals of a FDL tendon transfer surgery are to relieve pain and to help restore the arch in patients with painful fallen arches. A fallen arch occurs when the foot loses its support and flattens out, generally due to weakening of tendons and ligaments in the foot.

  • Lapidus for Hallux Valgus

    The Lapidus procedure is a surgical procedure used to treat a bunion deformity, also known as hallux valgus. It involves fusing the joint between the first metatarsal and one of the small bones in your midfoot, the medial cuneiform. Surgery includes removing the cartilage surfaces from both bones, correcting the angular deformity, then placing hardware (screws and often a small plate) to allow the two bones to grow together, or fuse. This surgery often is done to correct a bunion deformity with a very large angle, or when there is increased mobility through the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint. When the TMT joint has too much looseness or movement, the condition is known as hypermobility or instability. When this joint becomes hypermobile, the first metatarsal moves too far in one direction and the big toe compensates by moving too much in the other direction. When this happens, a bunion can develop.

    The goal of the Lapidus procedure is to surgically treat hallux valgus that is caused by first TMT joint hypermobility. When the first TMT joint is fused, the first metatarsal will not move abnormally. This will allow the first toe to stay straight and decrease the risk of the bunion coming back.

  • Lapidus for Hallux Valgus

    The Lapidus procedure is a surgical procedure used to treat a bunion deformity, also known as hallux valgus. It involves fusing the joint between the first metatarsal and one of the small bones in your midfoot, the medial cuneiform. Surgery includes removing the cartilage surfaces from both bones, correcting the angular deformity, then placing hardware (screws and often a small plate) to allow the two bones to grow together, or fuse. This surgery often is done to correct a bunion deformity with a very large angle, or when there is increased mobility through the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint. When the TMT joint has too much looseness or movement, the condition is known as hypermobility or instability. When this joint becomes hypermobile, the first metatarsal moves too far in one direction and the big toe compensates by moving too much in the other direction. When this happens, a bunion can develop.

    The goal of the Lapidus procedure is to surgically treat hallux valgus that is caused by first TMT joint hypermobility. When the first TMT joint is fused, the first metatarsal will not move abnormally. This will allow the first toe to stay straight and decrease the risk of the bunion coming back.

  • Lesser Metatarsal Shortening Osteotomy

    Each foot has five metatarsals. These are the long bones of the foot. They connect the toes to the rest of the foot. They also make the ball of the foot. The lesser metatarsals are the bones that connect to the second through fifth toes (not the first, or big toe).

    An osteotomy is a cut made in the bone. It is similar to breaking the bone but in a very controlled manner. A lesser metatarsal shortening osteotomy changes the pressure distribution under the ball of the foot, relieving pain. It also can be used to put a chronically dislocated toe back in position.

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