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  • Custom Diabetic Shoes

    People who suffer from diabetes can have problems with circulation, nerves, immunity, and deformity. Occasionally one or more of these may exist as an isolated issue but often people suffer from more than one at the same time.

    • Circulation: People with circulation problems don’t have as much oxygenated blood supplying their feet as other individuals and therefore have difficulty healing any wounds.
    • Nerves: Those who have nerve problems can develop a blister and oftentimes not even know it is there until they take off their shoes.
    • Immunity: Some individuals with diabetes have a diminished response of their immune system. Because of this, they can get an infection from a cut or blister more easily and have more difficulty treating it.
    • Deformity: People who suffer from diabetes can have collapse of the arch of their foot or other deformities which makes the foot more difficult to place into off-the-shelf shoes because of the risk of blisters developing over areas of high pressure.

    Proper footwear is therefore very important for people with diabetes. Your foot and ankle orthopaedic specialist can help you choose proper footwear and recommend shoe modifications to protect your feet.

  • How to Keep Your Feet Flexible

    When you take time to do a few foot flexibility exercises each day, it not only helps reduce any current discomfort you may have, but it can also help you avoid foot pain and injury in the future. Click the button below for diagrams and instructions on how to perform several foot flexibility exercises that can be practiced at home, such as towel curls and toe raises.

  • How to Prepare for Foot or Ankle Surgery: Part I

    Use this three-part guide to help make your orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery and recovery go smoothly. You achieve the best results when you work with your surgeon to prepare for surgery and post-surgical recovery. Part 1 will focus on what to do before your surgery.

  • How to Prepare for Foot or Ankle Surgery: Part II

    Use this three-part guide to help make your orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery and recovery go smoothly. You achieve the best results when you work with your surgeon to prepare for surgery and post-surgical recovery. Part 2 will focus on what to do the day of your surgery.

  • How to Prepare for Foot or Ankle Surgery: Part III

    Use this three-part guide to help make your orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery and recovery go smoothly. You achieve the best results when you work with your surgeon to prepare for surgery and post-surgical recovery. Part 3 will focus on what to do in the days immediately after your surgery.

  • How to Select Children's Shoes

    Most children learn to walk at about the time of their first birthday, although some learn months earlier or later. As your child begins to walk, you may have your first questions about what shoes he or she should wear. A growing child will need new shoes frequently, and more questions will arise.

    You should ask yourself the following questions when selecting your child's shoes:

    • How does the shoe fit?
    • How is the shoe made?
    • Is the type of shoe appropriate for your child's age?
  • How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    Following an ankle sprain, you should start strengthening exercises once you can bear weight comfortably and your range of motion is near full. There are several types of strengthening exercises. It is easiest to begin with isometric exercises that you do by pushing against a fixed object with your ankle.

    Once you have mastered isometric exercises, you can progress to isotonic exercises. In isotonic exercises, you use your ankle's range of motion against some form of resistance. The photos below show isotonic exercises performed with a resistance band, which you can get from your local physical therapist or a sporting goods store.

  • How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    After the initial pain and swelling from your ankle sprain have subsided (usually within 5-7 days) and you can tolerate weight on your foot, you can begin stretching exercises in stages. The goal of these exercises is to restore your ankle's range of motion.

    Once ankle range of motion has been almost or completely restored, you must strengthen your ankle. Along with strengthening, you should work toward a feeling of stability and comfort in your ankle, which foot and ankle ankle orthopaedic specialists call proprioception.

  • How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    After the initial pain and swelling from your ankle sprain have subsided (usually within 5-7 days) and you can tolerate weight on your foot, you can begin stretching exercises in stages. The goal of these exercises is to restore your ankle's range of motion.

    Once ankle range of motion has been almost or completely restored, you must strengthen your ankle. Along with strengthening, you should work toward a feeling of stability and comfort in your ankle, which foot and ankle ankle orthopaedic specialists call proprioception.

  • How to Wear High Heels to Avoid Injury

    High-heeled shoes are a popular fashion choice, but wearing them can lead to foot pain and injury. Some common injuries and pain associated with wearing high heels may be prevented with the following steps.

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